How on target is the NHS to going paperless in 2018?

Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt has been seeking a paperless records target of 2018 for the NHS since 2013.   In a recent focused healthcare survey of 67 members of the Health CIO Network and CCIO Leaders Network of clinicians and digital health IT leaders, there remains a mixed response:

•  67% stated they were ‘quite confident’ or ‘extremely confident’ their organisation will be paper-light by 2020.
•  14% stated they are ‘not at all confident’ or ‘not very confident’ of achieving the target.

However, on the question of having “integrated health and care records, enabling effective co-ordination of health and social care, by 2020” there was less certainty:

•  56% said they were ‘extremely confident’ or ‘quite confident’ of achieving this, but a quarter (24%), said they were ‘not at all confident’ or ‘not very confident’.
•  28% said they were confident of giving patients read/write access to their records, while 53% said they were not confident.

The top priorities for most of those involved focused on:

  • moving to paperless working – 73%
  • improving quality of services – 68%
  • supporting new models of care – 67%

When asked about their next major IT project, these were reported as:

1.  Top ranking for personal health records and patient portals, to give patients access to their medical record and test results, plus services such as appointment booking and email consultations.
2.  Next were shared record initiatives
3.  Third were e-prescribing and medicines management.
4.  In fourth place finally, one-third of respondents said Electronic Patient Records (EPR) – suggesting many are perhaps already some way down the line with this already?

Not surprisingly, with all the other cutbacks facing the NHS, this drive to go paperless might have a lot of goodwill in the sector to deliver, but the barriers facing NHS providers can be summarised by two principle points of feedback:

  • lack of adequate resource (73% affirmed that their IT budget was insufficient)
  • lack of staffing resource

With the breakup of the NHS from a truly national health service to a regional health service, primary and secondary healthcare organisations around the country will need to start showing they are making this work and that we are benefitting.  Then, we may wonder why it took so long when other major data institutions such as banks and industries such as insurance groups have managed to do this.  After all a 100-1 shot just won the Melbourne Cup.

NHS

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