‘Defence and protect’ marketing gets displayed in new smartphone technologies

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With the news of the Yahoo cyber attack on 23rd September 2016, it is worth taking a look back at new technology developments and launches in 2016, which put privacy and security at the forefront of their marketing spiel.

Solarin smartphone at a sky high price

In May 2016 Sirin Labs launched a new military-grade encrypted smartphone, the ‘Solarin’ (retailing at an eye watering £11,400 per device). It offers encrypted calls with a 256-bit AES algorithm. However the screen is 2K not 4K and runs on Android Lollipop, not Marshmallow and its Qualcomm processor is 2015’s model.

Whilst clearly targeting wealthy professionals for whom privacy and security is a driver to purchase, this ‘hostage’ price will be way beyond the pocket of most. However, businesses and consumers shouldn’t be alarmed, as putting up to date cyber security antivirus and anti-malware software on smartphone devices goes a long way to protecting the user, at less than a tenth of the price on top end devices.

You won’t find me – Snowden’s iPhone introspection machine

Meanwhile, a smartphone sleeve methodology (currently only for the iPhone 6), that tells its owner when their phone is being hacked, is being designed by US whistleblower Edward Snowden in conjunction with hardware hacker Andrew ‘Bunnie’ Huang, was revealed at a closed MIT Media Lab launch in July. The iPhone was selected as it is generally regarded as being hard to hack.

Whilst Snowden’s motivations to thwart digital surveillance may be politically motivated in seeking to protect activists from location detection by law enforcement agencies, the dual edge of their pitch highlights the trend for cyber criminals to seek to seek to install malware on smartphone devices, whilst the user is on the move (all unbeknownst to the user). The case aims to track whether or not the phones’ radios are transmitting, as trusting the phone is in airplane mode or sticking it in a ‘Faraday bag’ to block radio signals has proven insufficient. With the prevalence of clever malware which can make a smartphone appear to be off, it is daunting to users to know how well protected they and their data are from harm. Again, it’s a mixture of best practice vigilance, cyber security software and good information security management.

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