Amicus ITS Awarded Full Certification For Cyber Essentials Plus

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Amicus ITS has announced its award of the higher level ‘Cyber Essentials Plus’ status.  This industry-backed technical security scheme seeks to heighten the defences of companies against threat.  For Amicus ITS with its long history of serving healthcare, regulated industries and blue chip corporates, it was a logical and natural extension of its existing security standards.

Led by Standards Co-Ordinator Emma Purr of Amicus ITS’ Security & Compliance Team, Emma Purr said:  “This was a good team effort, supported by members of our technical Escalation Team.  Cyber Essentials Plus is normally a first step-in for organisations to gain the more stringent security accreditation, ISO 27001.  Cyber Essentials Plus requires a 5-step security approach, whilst information security standard ISO27001 has 114 control requirements in 14 groups and 35 control objectives which must be addressed, so is both very broad and very deep.  However, we’ve done it in reverse, having gained our ISO27001 status back in July 2014. This was however no walk in the park and illustrates the critical importance of ensuring robust defences exist around your business.  Obtaining Cyber Essentials Plus status has further strengthened our resilience and is great to have on show as another recognised security badge”.

What is Cyber Essentials Plus about?

To create the UK Cyber Essentials scheme, the UK Government worked with the Information Assurance for Small and Medium Enterprises (IASME) consortium and the Information Security Forum (ISF) for several years before launching the current system in June 2014.  Backers also include the Federation of Small Businesses (FSB), the Confederation of British Industry (CBI) and various insurance institutions.  Forming a set of comprehensive and challenging technical controls, it endorses compliance for organisations to create better technical protection from cyber attack and misuse of systems.  With standards which are risk-based and prompted by international best practice, they include aspects such as physical security, staff awareness and data backup.

What does Cyber Essentials Plus focus on?

Amicus ITS had to focus on five mitigation strategies:

1.   Boundary firewalls and internet gateways – for any user trying to access any websites which may have malicious content
2.   Secure configuration – ensuring the administration control of all user devices are securely configured, so the rights on what can be downloaded is appropriate and controlled.
3.   User access control eg, new starters only have access to the systems they require as part of their job; special access privileges which are restricted to a limited number of authorised individuals, which includes domain admin and the restriction of selected system administrators to be able to make any changes at a high level to internal systems and security firewalls; plus password strengthening and complexity in relation to service accounts. These get changed regularly – and automatically on the exit of any personnel.
4.   Malware protection – ensuring that relevant antivirus malware software is installed and kept up to date, which scans files and web locations automatically on access to identify they are safe and also to re-endorse the protection against accessing unsafe websites which get automatically blocked.
5.   Patch management – this ensures all software running on company devices are licenced and up to date, installed in a timely manner and that out of date software is removed from devices. Additionally, that security patches are deployed automatically on release.

Anyone wishing to discuss business information security issues or about being supported to obtain Cyber Essentials status, should contact the Sales team or speak to JP Norman on 02380 429429.

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UK healthcare: cyber attack focus

NHS
More than 113 million patient records were stolen from hospitals and healthcare facilities around the globe as a result of security failures and cyber-attacks in 2015.

IBM’s Cyber Security Intelligence Index naming the healthcare industry as the number one attacked industry in 2015, it is no surprise that 41% of all security breaches reported to the UK’s information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) year were from the health sector.

These attacks have not only damaged the reputation of healthcare organisations but also their bank balances. The ICO has issued 11 fines amounting to £1.4 million between April 2010 and November 2015, with one NHS trust fined £325,000 for the use of unencrypted devices.

Notable cyber-attacks and security breaches in the healthcare industry
October 2016 North Lincolnshire and Goole NHS Foundation Trust (NLAG) had its systems infected with a virus that resulted in cancelling at least 35 patient operations, and other patients had to be relocated whilst the threat was dealt with.

In 2015
56 Dean Street, an NHS HIV, clinic released email addresses of 781 patients while sending out its monthly newsletter.   730 of these addresses contained the full names of the recipients. The breach was an internal error that the ICO rewarded with a £180,000 fine.

NHS-approved online pharmacy company, Pharmacy2U, sold details of more than 20,000 of its customers to marketing companies without their knowledge or consent. This breach resulted in the ICO fining the pharmacy £130,000.

Why is the healthcare industry under attack?

Better technology and the move to paper-free healthcare allows health professionals to look up and share life-saving information wherever and whenever it is needed. This is vital in improving patient care but it has brought the industry into the sights of cyber criminals.

Personal confidential data is valuable to those with malicious intent, meaning that health and social care systems will increasingly be at risk from external threats and potential breaches as technology becomes more prevalent. This has been emphasised by Lynne Dunbrack, research vice president for the International Data Corporation (IDC): “Frankly, health care data is really valuable from a cyber-criminal standpoint. It could be 5, 10 or even 50 times more valuable than other forms of data.”

Reviewing data security for the health and care industry has found that internal breaches are often caused by people finding workarounds to burdensome processes and outdated technology – and that those people may be unaware of their responsibilities.

How to stop these attacks

Step 1: Cyber Essentials certification

Cyber Essentials is the UK-Government-backed security scheme that sets out five security controls that could prevent around 80% of basic cyber-attacks, improving cyber security and preserving the reputation of the healthcare industry.

Cyber Essentials certification also demonstrates to patients, suppliers and third parties that data security is being taken seriously.  Amicus ITS works with CREST approved, cyber security organisations to ensure that your status has been independently verified by a third-party vulnerability scan.

Step 2: ISO 27001

ISO 27001 is the international standard that describes best practice for an Information Security Management System (ISMS). It encompasses people, processes and technology, recognising that information security within the healthcare industry is not about technology alone.

Step 3: Protect your perimeter

With threats and threat actors continuously evolving there is a real need for intelligent perimeter protection as well as innovation with password and identity management. At Amicus ITS we are happy to provide advice to help ensure your data is as secure as possible.

Amicus ITS specialist information governance and security division, provides services to support NHS and public sector organisations. Our client base is substantial and includes corporations of all sizes. We believe our success in winning and retaining clients is due to Amicus ITS’ deep and ongoing understanding of N3 compliance requirements in the UK.

‘Panama Papers’ – a wake up call for the legal sector

April’s data breach legal, trust and accounting firm victim Mossack Fonseca of Panama, offers a perfect storm warning for law firms.  As reported in last week’s blog (see link), the legal sector is a highly attractive and potentially susceptible target for the armies of cyber attackers due to the sensitive data held by law firms about their clients.

All law firms should take the Panama breach as a major wake-up call,” says founder and executive chairman of IT Governance, Alan Calder. “Law firms have notoriously been targets for cyber criminals because of the sensitive information they possess. More recently, the scale and devastation that cyber breaches cause means that law firms need to consider their cyber security posture right now.”

The swift changes in cyber attack and swopping focus on market sectors makes trying to defend your crown jewels (ie. your data) ever more critical.  Law firms were ranked the seventh highest target for cyber criminals in CISCO’s 2015 Annual Security Report and in midsummer 2015, CISCO’s 2016 Annual Security Report noted that Professional firms were one of four sectors (Government, Electronics, Professional and Healthcare), most hit by Trojan related attacks, while the Professional Services vertical was hit with a high number of iFrame attacks.  Add to this, the UK’s Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) investigated 173 law firms two years ago over data protection breaches.  It is not a comforting picture.  But there are good things that can be done by taking a proactive stance on security.

The ICO acknowledges ‘There is no “one size fits all” solution to information security, as the security measures that are appropriate for a particular organisation will be different to another. However, given the pressures facing the legal sector, companies would be well advised to adopt a risk based approach to deciding what level of security is required and where – and to ask pertinent security questions from the third party contractors and suppliers they use.

ISO 27001 Information Security Management System (ISMS) provides a risk based approach to data security.  When rolled out through the organisation it can push down through the supply chain to raise standards with third party contractors and suppliers.  Whilst no organisation can be guaranteed to remain 100% free from threat 24×7, a law firm which creates a robust and regularly monitored cyber security posture, will be better prepared to fend off, or respond quickly and effectively through tested policy to a breach.   What this means for the firm’s customers and stakeholders are higher levels of assurance, as well as enabling you to meet growing legal and regulatory data protection obligations.

As with all things technological these days, it’s not just about knowing what’s in your estate to protect, it’s about strategically identifying for the business what you might need to consider adding to your infrastructure, to build peace of mind for your Board and customers.  That journey will ultimately be better travelled with an expert MSP which has ISO 27001, a passion for data security, a keen eye on cyber security – and one which can not only advise but is able to deliver 24×7.

ISOIEC 27001 with UKAS

Warning from Information Commissioner – data security too lax in legal profession

With law firms the seventh most targeted business group according to the Cisco 2015 Annual Security Report, it is probably little surprise that the Information Commissioner, Christopher Graham, has warned the profession to improve its information security practices after 15 reported data breach incidents involving members of the industry in three months.

Christopher Graham commented: “The number of breaches reported by barristers and solicitors may not seem that high, but given the sensitive information they handle, and the fact that it is often held in paper files rather than secured by any sort of encryption, that number is troubling. It is important that we sound the alarm at an early stage to make sure this problem is addressed before a barrister or solicitor is left counting the financial and reputational damage of a serious data breach.”

The Law Society Gazette announced that the ICO investigated 173 UK law firms in 2014 for a variety of incidents that may have breached the Data Protection Act 1998 (DPA).

Solicitors and barristers hold a veritable treasure chest of data including: confidential business data, proprietary information and intellectual property, litigation strategy information, personally identifiable information, and other legally sensitive information.

The impact for the legal profession is serious.  The penalties for a law firm quite profound.  If found guilty of breaching the DPA, law firms can face fines of up to £500,000 from the ICO, as well as a damaging loss of credibility.

Graham warns about data security Principle 7 of the DPA, which states that “Appropriate technical and organisational measures shall be taken against unauthorised or unlawful processing of personal data and against accidental loss or destruction of, or damage to, personal data”. 

The ICO says he is mindful that there is “no one size fits all” solution, so “…[legal firms] should adopt a risk-based approach to deciding what level of security you need”, in order to mitigate the risk.

The efficacy of ISO 27001 and best-practice cyber security IS that necessary safeguard.  ISO27001 as an ISMS, wraps people, processes and technology with an enterprise-wide approach to protecting information – in whatever form it is held – based on the specific threats the organisation actually faces.  This acts as the counterpoint to inadvertent threats posed by untrained staff, inadequate procedures and out-of-date software solutions.

Responsible companies should certainly take heed of his advice and do more to protect their client data.   This may be in the form of gaining the certification directly, or alternatively, outsourcing to a reputable established IT Managed Service Provider which holds this this essential accreditation to properly consult and set about the necessary measures to formally protect clientele, finances and reputation.  What price reputation?

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Week’s Technology News – 27th February 2015

Boards acknowledge cyber risk on their 2015 agenda

Back in 2013, following a KPMG report that cyber leaks at FTSE 350 firms were putting the UK’s economic growth and national security at risk, the heads of UK intelligence agencies MI5 and GCHQ then asked leading businesses to take part in a Cyber Governance Health Check.  The results were a stark wake up call.

As we reported in our blog on 19th December, Board engagement is pivotal to the success of any cyber security plan and thwarting the eye popping 80% of preventable attacks in 2014.

The 2015 Cyber Governance Health Check has just been published and reveals that 88% of companies are including cyber risk on their Risk Register with 58%+ anticipating an increased risk over the next 12 months.  However, only 21% say their boards get comprehensive information and only 17% regard themselves as having a full understanding of the risks. This is clearly insufficient in the light of the continuing squeeze on data security and compliance measures.

You do not have to be a FTSE 350 to want continued trust from clients and the comfort of having up to date data security measures.   So wake up and smell the budding roses of 2015 and do your own health check review now:

  • Re-evaluate what the unique crown jewels of your organisation are (key information and data assets) as they may have changed in in the 12 months.
  • Review risk from any 3rd party suppliers and avoid contractual complacency – get into active compliance.
  • Be pro-active about risk and create a competitive advantage of rivals.
  • Arrange for a ‘pen test’ and get in shape to be security fit for purpose in 2015.

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Windows Server 2003 is dying – but Windows Server 2012 will offer an elixir

With the forthcoming end of life for Windows Server 2003 and cessation of support from Microsoft on 15th July 2015, the effect will be severe for the many business still running this server in their data centre with exposure to cyber attack, unless considered steps are taken now to plan for upgrade.

Microsoft’s own survey recently confirmed that there were 22 million ‘instances’ (database environments) with WS2003 still running.

Organisations clearly need to plan their migration strategy – and quickly – if they are going to protect their infrastructure. End of support means no patches, no safe haven and no compliance.  Any company continuing to run WS2003 beyond July will fail regulatory compliance audits which could result in losing commercial contracts. So delays are not only expensive but highly risky.

The advances in the data centre with Windows Server 2012 RT offer integrated virtualisiation of compute, storage and networking along with enterprise class scalability and security.  The Cloud options of Microsoft Azure and Office 365 will deliver applications faster and increase productivity and flexibility – and take away risk.

Security implications

  • Software and Hardware compatibility – If you are running a mixture of physical and virtualised servers, then priority should go to addressing physical assets, as most WS2003 licences are tied to the physical hardware.
  • Compliance against many industry requirements has moved from a best practice ‘good to have’, to a mandatory requirement, so no option.
  • Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI DSS) v2, v3 – providing adequate assurance levels to meet the requirements of PCI will fail.
  • UK Government – connecting to the Public Services Network (PSN), whether through an assured connection or via an Inter Provider Encryption Domain (IPED) will be a headache if updates cannot be supported securely.
  • Industry standards Industry standards such as ISO 27001:2013 and the Cloud Security Alliance all require you ensure your systems and applications are up to date.
  • Disaster Recovery and Resilience  How do you re-start servers that are no longer supported? If DR is key to you business then migrating is a necessity will be fairly expensive.

Planning to move

  • Integrate your servers and their lifecycle into your strategy and risk management process.
  • Check what the servers do for you and do data mapping, flow and services exercise.
  • Identify your core assets and check them against confidentiality, integrity, availability and likelihood of compromise to help future design and investment decisions.
  • Create fit-for-purpose security architecture within your Cloud (ie should you need to retain legacy data which is rarely used – create security zones using layered firewalls, ingress and egress controls, file integrity and protective monitoring.
  • Test – lots – and then get a 3rd party certified security professional to conduct an ethical hack.
  • Failure to plan is planning to fail – do not let your business suffer by putting your head in the sand.

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