Countering ransomware – it’s time to patch the human

Ransomware relies on human fallibility crypto-ransomware, malware that extorts money from victims by encrypting their files and systems until they pay a ransom, has been much in the news since WannaCry hobbled IT systems around the world last month. While much was made of the fact that WannaCry spread through networks by exploiting SMBv1 vulnerabilities in unsupported Windows systems (such as Windows XP, Windows 8 and Windows Server 2003), it is unusual for ransomware to self-replicate in the way WannaCry did.

Often, ransomware, in common with most other forms of malware, is spread by drive-by downloads or phishing campaigns, both of which exploit human error. So, even if you use robust anti-virus and anti-malware solutions, conduct regular penetration tests and ensure you keep your systems up to date and install the latest patches, your system could still be compromised thanks to a careless employee.

According to a 2016 report by SentinelOne:

  • 39% of organisations in the UK were hit by ransomware in the previous year
    • 72% of those infections were attributable to phishing
    • 38% were attributable to drive-by downloads from compromised websites

People are frequently acknowledged as the weakest link in any security system. But with better levels of staff knowledge, companies are more secure as you can, in effect, ‘patch’ your employees. Therefore, a best-practice approach to information security such as an ISO 27001 compliant ISMS (Information Security Management System), follows a holistic approach that addresses people as well as processes and technology.

Amicus ITS takes security seriously.  “We say security is part of our DNA here” advises  JP Norman, Director of Technology, Security & Governance, “and I consistently refer to the importance of “the squishy bits” (ie. the people) in IT management.  You can deploy the best systems and infrastructure money can buy –  but you have to ensure your people are trained too.”

WannaCry ransomware attack goes global

 

News on Friday 12th May that NHS England had suffered a major ransomware cyber attack has since been extended to a wider victim base. We now know that the attack has affected around 150 countries, with major hits on the UK and Russia. It is estimated to have affected over 200,000 users to date.  In the UK 48 NHS trusts have reported problems at hospitals, GP surgeries and pharmacies, along with 13 NHS bodies in Scotland – and no doubt the early part of this week will result in more problems as staff come into work and switch their PCs back on.

The hack which targeted Windows machines was miraculously stopped in its tracks from spreading by a young security expert (under name @MalwareTechBlog) who accidentally hit the kill switch on the malware by registering the hard code as a domain name which had been seeded by its creator

SAFEGUARDS:

There are some urgent checks that all companies and organisations should be making in the next 24 hours:

  1. Ensure you are up to date on patching your environment– a lot of organisations were caught out because they didn’t (and Microsoft released a patch for the vulnerability exploited by WannaCry in March 2017).
  2. Check your Anti Virus is up to date (and preferably use a cloud based service ie Webroot)
  3. Ensure you back up all your essential data in line with your businesses Recovery Time Objective (RTO) and Recovery Point Objective (RPO), so you can’t be held to ransom and fearful of operational losses.
  4. Communicate with your staff to alert them to avoid clicking on any suspicious emails and making sure that your operating system software is up to date (it was a rare move for Microsoft to release security updates for unsupported software such as XP as a direct result of this event)

Companies that want advice on data security, can contact Amicus ITS in confidence on 02380 429429.

 

Law firms face increasing cyber attacks in 2016

law society of ireland

The start to Summer 2016 has seen a sizeable increase in recorded attacks on legal firms in Ireland, as reported by RTE news on 5th June 2016.  Over a dozen firms have recently suffered ransomware attacks.

Why is the legal sector a prime target?
The legal sector is a prime target for cyber criminals on one side due to the sensitivity and volume of private client data held on their computer systems and secondly, because of the large sums of money held by solicitors in their client accounts on a daily basis.

What are common ways for ransomware attacks to take place?
Computer systems can be compromised by ransomware attacks either through email or a web browser.   A user might open what to them looked like an innocuous email, which once opened immediately encrypts files across their entire network.  The message (which can be remarkably polite), then warns that immediate payment is required by a given deadline, or the files will be destroyed.  Victims will often see a timer ratchet as well, whereby any delays to settlement increase the sum demanded.  The warning is stark and often along the lines of:  “Any attempt to damage or remove this software will lead to the immediate destruction of the private key to your server.”

What kind of sums are involved in ransomware attacks?
Sums can range from a few hundred to many thousands of £pounds.  In this particular spate of attacks, the Irish legal firms had had ransom demands of between 5,000 – 30,000 Euros from the criminals to unlock their computers.

One solicitor wishing to stay anonymous commented: “The accounts system was in jeopardy, which we would be accountable for a closing balance of E4-5m every day to clients.  Trying to identify 2,500 clients whose money was actually in the account to the very cent was never going to be achievable going forwards”.

The general advice is for all organisations would be:

•      To regularly review your data security policies and procedures (and ensure they are up to date and fit for purpose reflecting the current threat landscape).
•      To regularly back up your data to mitigate any losses
•      To act expediently and deal with the issue
•      To deploy up to date antivirus software
•      Have effective web filtering
•      To utilise up to date firewalls
•      To educate staff to heighten everyone’s awareness about cyber security – what different attacks look like – and importantly what their process and actions should be should they receive something they believe to be a cyber threat.

This news comes on the heels of the annual risk management survey by Legal Business and Marsh which found that “IT security breach / data management accident or breach” was the highest risk to law firms in terms of damage it could cause and the likelihood of it occurring.

For regulated industries especially, the demand for effective and contemporary security systems and knowledgeable management teams will serve as a significant reassurance to their customers.  Amicus ITS provides specific Security as a Services offerings to protect against cyber attack. These include ‘Foxcatcher’ and ‘Amicus Viper’.  Anyone wishing to discuss any cyber security issues in confidence can ring the security team on 02380 429429.